PROJECT PUBLICATIONS

 

OUR STORIES ABOUT TEACHING AND LEARNING: A Pedagogy of Consequence for Yukon First Nation Settings

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Abstract

In this study, First Nation community members in Canada’s YukonTerritory share their stories about teaching and learning, both in informal and formalsettings, in an effort to identify practices that might serve teachers to be moreresponsive to their First Nation students. In all, 52 community members between theages of 15 and 82 shared their stories and assisted in identifying eight categories ofpractice and thought associated with effective teaching practices for this FirstNation. Based upon these categories of thought and practice, we present a pedagogicalframework for teachers and, finally, illustrate how this profile and the storiesabout teaching and learning are being used for adjusting and improving teachingpractice in this First Nation. 

CURRICULUM CHANGE AND SELF-GOVERNING AGREEMENTS:  A Yukon First Nation Case Study

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Abstract

Recent developments in Canada’s Yukon Territory draw attention to how political changes have potential for accelerating practices in education that are responsive to Indigenous Peoples’ cultural knowledge systems and practices. In this study, through the use of case study methodology, an account of the changes that have occurred in one First Nation are presented. Further, the study seeks to identify the processes influencing the development. Finally, tensions at the classroom, school, and community levels arising from these changes and anticipated changes are described.

CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE TEACHING IN YUKON FIRST NATION SETTINGS: What does it look like and what is its influence?

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Abstract

This study presents a pedagogical framework to inform culturally responsive teaching in a Yukon First Nations community. The paper describes the community-based processes used to develop the framework, and presents accounts from teachers who have used the framework to inform their teaching. Preliminary indications of the adjusted teaching practices’ influence on student learning are presented, using qualitative data describing the changed teaching practices, and quantitative data specific to the changed practices’ impact on student learning. Finally, the paper outlines the ongoing community-based research work in the Yukon context, with reference to the work’s potential significance to the wider education community.

Tr’ondëk Hwech Education Department 

(Public School K - 12)

 

Abstract

This paper explains the three parts of the development and commitment to the education of the Yukon Fist Nation people